Electronic Circuits and electronic circuits, electronic schematics plus an extensive resource for hobbyists, inventors and engineers

DiscoverCircuits.com has links to 45,000+ electronic circuits, cross-referenced
into 500+ categories.    We have searched the web to help you find quick design ideas.

HOME Schematics Hobby Corner Dave's Circuits Electronic Resources Contact Info
Imagineering Ezine    Discover Solar Energy Dave Johnson & Associates Faraday Touch Switches
Welcome to DiscoverCircuits.com - online since 2002

See Media Kit for
Advertising Opportunities

Attention Designers:  Please alert us by eMail if we have linked to sites
where your original material has been copied without your permission.
We will change to the LINK to your site.  
Thank you.

 


Control Circuits

 
#'s - A       B - C       D - G        H - L       M - P        Q - S        T - U        V - Z
 

Last Updated: October 24, 2017 02:54 PM

Circuits Designed by Dave Johnson, P.E.

14v LED Auxiliary Lamp with a 60 Watt Lamp   This circuit controls power to a standard 60 watt lamp plus generates an auxiliary 14v DC supply which can power an automotive style 12 LED array . . . Hobby Circuit designed by David Johnson P.E.-July, 2006


Links to electronic circuits, electronic schematics, designs for engineers, hobbyists, students & inventors:

13 Volt Differential Temperature Controller -  for hot water and hot air system control __ Designed by G. Forrest Cook

1381-basedType 1 (Voltage Controlled) Solar Engine -  Two simple solar engine designs using a 1381* voltage discriminator. __ Designed by Wilf Rigter

14 Volt Strobe -  This circuit uses12V DC instead od mains AC.  This is very good idea if you don't want to mess with direct mains voltage connected circuit or you want to run  stroboscope from batteries __ Designed by Tomi Engdahl

14v LED AuxiliaryLamp with a 60 Watt Lamp -  This circuit controls power to a standard 60 watt lamp plus generates an auxiliary 14v DC supply which can power an automotive style 12 LED array . . . Hobby Circuit designed by David Johnson P.E.-July, 2006

14Watt Audio Amplifier + pre-amp & tone control -  This is the schematic diagram of 14 watt power audio amplifier included the pre-amp circuit and tone control circuit.  I think this is complete audio system, just need an input and output   (speaker)

1558VIN to 33.3V 3A LED Automotive Headlight Driver with Up to 98.5% Efficiency -  Airplanes and big trucks with 24V batteries need powerful, efficient and robust headlights and spotlights.  This circuit shows a 33.3 V, 3A   (nine Luminus SSR-90 LEDs) buck-boost LED driver that runs from 15V to 58V input with up to 98.5% efficiency.  The 4-switch synchronous topology drives high power LEDs with minimal switch power loss   (and minimal temperature rise) __ Linear Technology/Analog Devices App Note, Mar 9th 2012

16 LED Chaser -  By request, here is a 16 LED sequential chaser.  The LED's light one at a time, sequencing from bottom to top, then back down from top to bottom.  This circuit must be driven from some kind of clock generator.  Each pulse from the clock changes which LED is lit.  This circuit has been prototyped by Tony Hullibarger.  Thanks to Tony, errors were found and corrected! __ Designed by billd @ reprise.com

16 Stage Bidirectional LED Sequencer -  The bi-directional sequencer uses a 4 bit binary up/down counter   (CD4516) and two "1 of 8 line decoders"   (74HC138 or 74HCT138) to generate the popular "Night Rider" display.  A Schmitt Trigger oscillator provides the clock signal for the counter and the rate can be adjusted with the 500K pot.  Two additional Schmitt Trigger inverters are used as a SET/RESET latch to control the counting direction   (up or down).  Be sure to use the 74HC14 and not the 74HCT14, the 74HCT14 may not work due to the low TTL input trigger level.  When the highest count is reached   (1111) the low output __ Designed by Bill Bowden

16-Way Clap-Operated Switch -  Control your home appliances without getting out of your bed.  You just have to clap in the vicinity of the microphone used in this circuit, which you can keep by the...__ Electronics Projects for You

1750Hz & 82.5Hz PiLoTtone generator with PIC12 IC -  My Radio amateur callsign is OZ2CPU.  I like to use Atmel AVR Atmega PIC16 PIC16F876 PIC16F84.  Most electronics easy made for the novice and something is for the more experienced.   __ Designed by Thomas Scherrer OZ2CPU

18 Stage LED Sequencer -  The question sometimes comes up of how to cascade 4017 decade counters for more than 10 sequencial stages.  The LED sequencer above shows a possible solution using a few extra parts.  When power is applied, the 15K resistor and 10uF cap at pin 15 will reset the counters to the zero count where pin 3 is at +12 and all other outputs are at zero.  The 2 diodes   (1n914) and 15 resistor form a AND gate so the clock pulse will be passed to the right side counter when the sequence starts.  When the right counter reaches the 10th count, .   __ Designed by Bill Bowden

1-pin controls relay, intermittent buzzer & status LED -  04/09/09  EDN-Design Ideas One pin controls relay, buzzer, and status LED for control applications __ Circuit Design by Kartik Joshi and Manik Chugh, Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology, Delhi, India

1-transistor FM Transmitter -  A truly minimalist circuit.  Performance is relatively poor and stability is a problem.  Q1 modulates the signal and acts as an oscillator.  L1 and C5 determine the frequency.  Decrease C5 for a higher frequency and vice-versa.  

1W White LED Night Light -  As many of you know, I have a pet peeve with poorly made LED night lights.  Often, the light from the LED quickly fades, so within months, the light is useless.  I have posted several versions of modified night lights using higher quality components.  This circuit is yet another version, which produces much more light than those other designs. . . . Hobby Circuit designed by Dave Johnson P.E.-November, 2008

1-wire controls LCD Module -  EDN-Design Ideas 03/20/2017    This one-wire LCD interface DI generates all the signals required to control the ubiquitous character display __ Circuit Design by Rex Niven

1-Wire Network Controls Remote SPI Peripherals -  09/04/08  EDN-Design Ideas This circuit controls a remote LED display by the 1-wire network through an SPI-compatible display controller __ Circuit Design by Michael Petersen, Maxim Integrated Products, Colorado Springs, CO

1-Wire Relay Control -  schematic only, no circuit description included __ Designed by Simon Atkin

1-Wire Satellite Position Controller -  After finally completing the 1-wire hub project I had time to build a mount for my Triax prime focus satellite dish.  I had also earlier bought two 18" Geotrack Dish Actuators and now needed a method of controlling them remotely from a computer.  So I had the bright idea of using 1-wire devices to control the process of switching the motor supplies and counting the pulses from the actuator sensor __ Designed by Simon Atkin

2 Channel RF AVR Remote Control -  How many times you needed some remote control to handle some electric device ? many times.  There are lot of remote controls like infrared, RF, SMS   (like my other circuit) and more.  The basic small-range remote controls are 2, Infrared and RF   (Radio Frequency).  One of the weaks of Infrared is that the signal can not pass the walls.  So, if you want to control your garage door, the only way is to use some RF remote control.  The circuit   (transmitter and receiver) use few components and ordinary   (I love few component circuits).  Its easy to build it because you don't have to tune-up any coil or variable capacitor.  The RF modules are fix to work in 418MHz area.  

2 channel RF remote control -  This RF remote control it runs at 418 MHz frequency and support up to 2 channels.  It is very safety as the transmitting code is changing every time you push any button   (roll-code function) __ Designed by Vassilis Serasidis

2 channel RF remote control on AVR -  How many times you needed some remote control to handle some electric device ? many times. There are lot of remote controls like infrared, RF, SMS (like my other circuit) and more. The basic small-range remote controls are 2, Infrared and RF (Radio Frequency). One of the weaks of Infrared is that the signal can not pass the walls. So, if you want to control your garage door, the only way is to use some RF remote control. 

2 Components Drive Stepper Motor -  EDN-Design Ideas 01/19/95    The extremely simple circuit in Fig 1 drives a stepper motor directly from 120V ac, 60 Hz.  Usually you need switched-dc voltages to drive a stepper motor.  But a stepper motor will run off ac lines if you introduce a 90 phase shift between the voltages applied to the motor's two windings. __ Circuit Design by Carl Spearow, Basler Electric,m Highland, IL

2 Line Intercom Plus a Telephone Changeover Switch -  circuit presented here can be used for connecting two telephones in parallel and also as a2-line intercom.  

2 Note Ribbon Controller -  Even if you've never played with a ribbon controller you have at least seen one and know what they are.  They are far and away the most organic and intuitive controller available for synthesizers.  Sliding a finger up and down the ribbon can control the pitch of an oscillator or some other parameter.   __ Designed by John Simonton

2 Pushbutton Motor Controller -  Two small pushbutton switches, a few diodes and two relays form a method to control on/off power to a brush motor as well as the motor direction.  The circuit was originally designed for a motorized lifting platform . . . Hobby Circuit designed by David Johnson P.E.-September, 2005

2 Signals Easily Control Tricolor LED -  09/14/95 EDN-Design Ideas Tricolor LEDs come in two- and three-pin packages.  Although the three-pin, or common-cathode, package easily lends itself to 2-bit control, wiring three crowded pins can be mechanically difficult.  Also, fewer manufacturers produce the three-pin types.  The two-pin package is easier to connect to a wiring harness and is readily available.  However, this package requires more control overhead, because, to light the LED yellow, the device must continuously alternate between red and green.   __ Circuit Design by Bob Richards, Digital Audio Corp, Raleigh, NC

2 Temperature Controlled Relays -  Switching Circuits:  These two circuits use Thermistors   (Temperature Dependent Resistors).  Circuit No.1 energizes the relay when the temperature rises above a preset level. Use it to switch things on when it gets hot. Circuit No.2 energizes the relay when the temperature falls below a preset level. Use it to switch things on when it gets cold.  __ Designed by Ron J.

2 Transistor Amplifier -  A 2 Watt audio amplifier made from discrete components.  This was one of the earliest circuits that I ever designed and built, in Spring 1982.  At that time I had only an analogue meter and a calculator to work with.  Although not perfect, this amplifier does have a wide frequency response, low harmonic distortion about 3%,  __ Designed by Andy Collinson

2 Transistor Flasher -  The basic two-transistor flasher shown below has found its way into dozens of applications due to its simplicity and versatility.  Applications have included such diverse circuits as a micropower low battery indicator, a lightning detector, a off-line.   __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

2 Transistor FM Transmitters -  While there are a plethora of similar 2-transistor schematics available, this one is above average.  A major improvement overlittle 1-transistor circuit that we've discussed previously, this transmitter consist of two stages.  first transistor is used to amplify audio, 

2 Transistor LED Flasher -  This 1.5 volt led fasher runs more than a year on a single 'd" cell and alternately flashes 2 LEDs at about a 1 second rate.  The circuit employs a 74HC14 CMOS hex inverter that will operate at very low voltages   (less than 1 volt).  One section is used as a squarewave oscillator   (pins 1 and 2) , while the others are wired to produce a short 10mS pulse on alternate edges of the square wave so the LEDs will alternate back and forth.  The output sections each use a capacitor charge pump to increase the voltage for the LEDs __ Designed by Bill Bowden

2 Transistor LED Flasher -  This circuit will flash a bright red LED as an attention getting device or fake care alarm. __ Designed by Bill Bowden

2 Transistor LED Flasher -  This is a classic 2 transistor astable multivibrator.  Many other NPN small signal or switching transistors can be used, including 2N4401, PN2222 or 2N2222 using the circuit on the left.  The circuit can also be inverted using PNP transistors.   __ Designed by Bill's Electronics Reference Library

2 Transistor LED Flasher -  Classic astable multivibrator using 2 transistors.  Transistor is not critical.  Try these: 2N4401, 2N2222, NTE123A, NTE123AP, NTE159, TUP/TUN and those in your junk box, you may find that most of them will work.   __ Designed by Tony van Roon  VA3AVR

2 Transistor LED Flasher 1 -  Circuit Only __ Designed by Tony van Roon  VA3AVR

2 Transistor LED Flasher 2 -  This circuit will flash a super-bright LED (5000+ mcd).  Good for fake car alarm or other attention getting device.  Component values are not critical, try anything else first from your junkbox.  Obviously, the 470 ohm resistor (R3) determines the LED's brightness and limits the current flow to about 20mA.390 ohm can also be used as a save value.  If you decide to go with a green or yellow led, which draw more current, you may want to replace the 470 ohm with an appropriate value.  Flash rate is determined by R2 and C1 __ Designed by Tony van Roon  VA3AVR

      <<<         >>>

Control Circuits:   #'s - A       B - C       D - G        H - L       M - P        Q - S        T - U        V - Z

 


Imagineering Ezine    Discover Solar Energy Dave Johnson & Associates Faraday Touch Switches



 About Us   |  Advertise on DiscoverCircuits.com   |   Report Broken Links  |    Link to DiscoverCircuits.com  |   
Privacy Policy


Discovercircuits.com endeavors to credit original designers.   Please alert us by eMail so we can
delete links to material that have been copied without your permission
.   Thank you.


Copyright of all original material on this website is the property
of David A. Johnson, P.E. (Dave Johnson & Associates ) unless otherwise noted.  

Linking is ALLOWED but COPYING any content or graphics to your web site is EXPRESSLY PROHIBITED.
All material is provided "as is" without guarantees or warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied.