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Ion Generator Circuits
 

Last Updated: October 13, 2017 03:03 AM


Links to electronic circuits, electronic schematics, designs for engineers, hobbyists, students & inventors:

Cheap but Sensitive Radiation Detector -  This project started out as a gag project, a "Nuclear War Detector".  The idea was to make a device that would flash a little red light if a nuclear attack were underway or if there were some sort of massive radiation spill right outside the house.  It would be like a rain detector built into an umbrella, perfectly functional but totally useless __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

Components for Ion Chambers -  Radiation Circuitscomponents used in making an ion chamber __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

Experimenter's Chamber -  This experimenter's chamber is made from a 4" (10 cm) diameter, 5.5" (14 cm) tall tin with a tight-fitting lid.  A 5-way binding post is mounted in the center of the can and a 4" (10 cm) wire is suspended from the post inside the can.  __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

Large Cookie Tin Ion Chamber -  Here is a truly simple experimenter's chamber made from an ordinary cookie tin.  This experimenter's chamber is made from a 4" (10 cm) diameter, 5.5" (14 cm) tall tin with a tight-fitting lid.  A 5-way binding post is mounted in the center of the can and a 4" (10 cm) wire is suspended from the post inside the can.  The wire length is short enough to insure that it doesn't touch the lid.  Another all-metal binding post and pin are installed in the bottom of the can, and a sheet of gray insulating plastic is glued into place to keep hastily constructed experiments from contacting the can.  The electrometer circuitry will be extremely sensitive to stray electric fields, so a shield is mandatory.   __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

My First Experimental Ion Chamber -  An ion chamber is an extremely simple device that uses this principle to detect ionizing radiation.  The basic chamber is simply a conducting can, usually metal, with a wire electrode at the center, well insulated from the chamber walls.  The chamber is most commonly filled with ordinary dry air but other gasses like carbon dioxide or pressurized air can give greater sensitivity.  A DC voltage is applied between the outer can and the center electrode to create an electric field that sweeps the ions to the oppositely charged electrodes.  Typically, the outer can has most of the potential with respect to ground so that the circuitry is near ground potential.  The center wire is held near zero volts and the resulting current in the center wire is measured.   __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

Negative & Positive Ion Generators -  These Ion Generators can create Either Negative or Positive Ions into the air from the Air.  The Pins produce the Ionization of the air at the Points of the Pins. 
A Fan is useful to help dispurse the Ions into the room.  Voltages greater than about 6, 000 volts Will create some Ozone, which can be harmful to a persons health.  Even thoughThis is a Static Voltage, It can give a BAD Shock if Touched.  SO BE CAREFUL.   __ Designed by G.L. Chemelec

PicAXE Ionization Chamber -  This simple radiation detector uses a PicAXE-08M microprocessor to measure the voltage drift rate on an ionization chamber's sense wire, eliminating the need for a high-value resistor.  An electrometer-grade JFET is used to buffer the voltage on a sense wire inside the chamber, and a PicAXE microprocessor measures the rate of change of that voltage, periodically discharging the wire through the JFET's gate-source junction.  This unorthodox way of discharging the ion chamber wire eliminates the need for a special, low-leakage switch, and takes advantage of the PicAXE's ability to use the same pin as an analog input or a digital output.   __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

Radon Detector for the Student -  This ionization chamber radon detector is designed to be easy for the student or hobbyist to build and use.  It can form the basis for a variety of experiments for Science Fair competitions, class projects, conversation pieces, or simply satisfying scientific curiosity.  Despite the extreme simplicity, the chamber can detect surprisingly low levels of radon by detecting the radioactive "radon daughters" produced when radon gas decays.  The detector could be used to investigate a variety of scientific questions and demonstrate scientific principles: __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

Super-Sensitive Ionization Chamber -  These "ion chambers" are nothing more than a bare wire stuck through a hole into a metal can! No special gas or sealing is required.  For best performance it is probably a good idea to add a desiccant to the inside of the can to keep the humidity low.  (I didn't!) Build one; its really simple! __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

Build this Negative Ion Detector -  Figure 1 shows a schematic diagram of the Ion Detector--a rather simple circuit consisting of three transistors   (two PN2907 PNP, and a single PN2222 NPN type) , three resistors, one capacitor, an antenna, a mA meter, and an LED __ Designed by Vincent Vollono

Even Cheaper & Simpler Ion Chamber -  Here is a really simple version of the above chamber that is surprisingly sensitive for its simplicity.  It uses the same coffee can as above but only one transistor.  Here are step-by-step instructions for constructing this really easy-to-build version.   __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

Ion Chamber Bias Supply -  After discovering that one of my bias batteries was jumping around a few volts, wreaking havoc with the readings, I decided to build a floating, regulated high voltage supply.  The result is a micro-power 110 volt supply that runs on an ordinary 6V __ Contact: Charles Wenzel of Wenzel Associates, Inc.

Negative Ion Detector -  Figure 1 shows a schematic diagram of the Ion Detector--a rather simple circuit consisting of three transistors   (two PN2907 PNP, and a single PN2222 NPN type) , three resistors, one capacitor, an antenna, a mA meter, and an LED __ Designed by Vincent Vollono

Negative Ion Generator #2 -  The design of the Negative-Ion Generator is fairly straightforward(see Fig.1). The circuit is a high voltage generator. It contains a standard 555 timer that's used to generate square-wave pulses. The pulses are applied to the base of the TIP120 NPN Darlington transistor. The Darlington provides sufficient current to the base of the 2N3055 power transistor to turn it on. Each. __ Designed by John Lovine

Negative Ion Generator 2 -  The design of the Negative-Ion Generator is fairly straightforward (see Fig.1).  The circuit is a high voltage generator.  It contains a standard 555 timer that's used to generate square-wave pulses.  The pulses are applied to the base of the TIP120 NPN Darlington transistor.  The Darlington provides sufficient current to the base of the 2N3055 power transistor to turn it on.  Each.   __ Designed by John Iovine

Negative Ion/Static Electricity Detector -  A sensitive detector for static electricity based around a single Field Effect Transistor It can also be used to detect the presence of negative ions, or test a negative ion generator.   __ Designed by Andy Collison

Negative-Ion Detector & Tester -  Figure 1 shows a schematic diagram of the Ion Detector--a rather simple circuit consisting of three transistors   (two PN2907 PNP, and a single PN2222 NPN type) , three resistors, one capacitor, an antenna, a mA meter, and an LED __ Designed by Vincent Vollono

Static Electricity Detector -  A sensitive detector for static electricity based around a single Field Effect Transistor It can also be used to detect the presence of negative ions, or test a negative ion generator.   __ Designed by Andy Collison


Ion Generator Circuits

 


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